WHY THE OCEAN?

All of life on Earth is dependent on a healthy and stable ocean. It's the very source of life itself. 

 
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The ocean is a mysterious, wonderful place – an alien world on our own planet just teeming with life.

The ocean is an invaluable resource for all life on Earth - it provides over half of the air we breath and helps our economy, estimated to have a conservative value of $1 trillion, generating $300-400 billion each in terms of food and livelihoods. The ocean regulates weather patterns and the climate, and stories over 90% of climate change heat. Life found in the ocean provides more than just a direct source of food for some – it provides hope of new medicines. The list goes on and on…

Despite all of this, however, over recent decades, human actions have made the ocean both unhealthy and unstable. Ocean change has become one of the greatest challenges facing humanity yet few people are paying attention and there’s even fewer acting. - awareness of the issues and fundamental role of the ocean is so low, ocean conservation is one of the least supported areas of conservation. This lack of awareness is only one contributing factor to the chronic underfunding of ocean science and conservation (it attracts less than 0.5% of philanthropic support). Ocean issues are complex and the results difficult to realize. 

The challenge of the ocean is that is out of sight and out of mind. At The Ocean Agency, we believe creative communication, paired with science and conservation, is the key to success.

Much of our work focuses on the protection and conservation of coral reefs. Coral reefs are one of the most critical ecosystems on the planet – supporting half a billion people and a quarter of all marine life. However, coral reefs are dying at unprecedented rates. We've already lost 50% of coral reefs in the last 30 years. Climate change is now their greatest threat. Our team knows, we’ve witnessed it in the making of the Netflix Original Documentary, Chasing Coral.

We are rapidly running out of time to protect coral reefs -- and we won’t get a better opportunity than this year: International Year of the Reef. We need to rapidly play catch-up, and do so in a creative, strategic way. The actions we take over the next few years will determine the future of this amazing ecosystem - possibly the most biodiverse on the planet.

 
 
 
  Coccolithophores  are tiny, microscopic phytoplankton made of calcium carbonate that create massive algal blooms and are important for their use in geological dating.

Coccolithophores are tiny, microscopic phytoplankton made of calcium carbonate that create massive algal blooms and are important for their use in geological dating.